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Acceptable Risk

4 Comments and 11 Shares
Good thing I'm not already prone to overthinking everyday decisions!
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teh_g
2 days ago
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I hate to admit I've don't this.
Roseville, CA
gordol
2 days ago
You don't this?
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3 public comments
jepler
2 days ago
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"it me", I think the youngs say?
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
Groxx
2 days ago
You mean the Younglings?
diannemharris
14 hours ago
youngin's if you are in the south
reconbot
2 days ago
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oh hey it's me!
New York City
alt_text_bot
2 days ago
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Good thing I'm not already prone to overthinking everyday decisions!

Linus Torvalds’ ZFS statements aren’t right—here’s the straight dope

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Linus Torvalds is eminently qualified to discuss issues with license compatibility and kernel policy. However, this does not mean he's equally qualified to discuss individual projects in project-specific context.

Enlarge / Linus Torvalds is eminently qualified to discuss issues with license compatibility and kernel policy. However, this does not mean he's equally qualified to discuss individual projects in project-specific context. (credit: Getty Images)

Last Monday in the "Moderated Discussions" forum at realworldtech.com, Linus Torvalds—founding developer and current supreme maintainer of the Linux kernel—answered a user's question about a year-old kernel maintenance controversy that heavily impacted the ZFS on Linux project. After answering the user's actual question, Torvalds went on to make inaccurate and damaging claims about the ZFS filesystem itself.

Given the massive weight automatically given Torvalds' words due to his status as founding developer and chief maintainer of the Linux kernel, we feel it's a good idea to explain both the controversial kernel change itself, and Torvalds' comments about both the change in question and the ZFS filesystem.

The original January 2019 controversy, explained

In January 2019, kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman decided to disable exporting certain kernel symbols to non-GPL loadable kernel modules.

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teh_g
179 days ago
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Roseville, CA
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Goop’s Netflix trailer: Paltrow sinks into a vagina, spews pseudoscience

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Promotional image of Oscar-winner Gwyneth Paltrow emerging from a stylized image of the female genital anatomy.

Enlarge / Promotional image of Oscar-winner Gwyneth Paltrow emerging from a stylized image of the female genital anatomy. (credit: Netflix)

Netflix released a trailer Monday for the six-episode series The Goop Lab with Gwyneth Paltrow, which—as expected—appears to spew as much pseudoscience and evidence-free wellness muck as the mogul's notorious "contextual commerce" business, Goop.

In Netflix's own words, the show intends to guide "deeply inquisitive" viewers through "boundary-pushing wellness topics," such as "energy healing and psychics." The show—like Goop—appears to be largely aimed at women, and the trailer's release was accompanied by an image of Paltrow appearing to descend into an artist's rendition of a vagina.

Goop critics were quick to decry the show, arguing that—like the brand—it actually intends to guide exploitable viewers through unproven and potentially dangerous health practices, such as the same garbage Goop has been promoting for years. And the show—like Goop—claims to "empower" women only by convincing them to try dubious treatments and products.

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teh_g
186 days ago
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I'm tempted to cancel my Netflix subscription since they insist on supporting this pseudoscience garbage...
Roseville, CA
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Coffee

1 Comment and 7 Shares


Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
I need to do a book of just comics that end with God laughing.


Today's News:
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teh_g
188 days ago
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Roseville, CA
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1 public comment
mcarson
187 days ago
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I don't want to start
Any blasphemous rumors
But I think that God's
Got a sick sense of humor
And when I die
I expect to find Him laughing

-Depeche Mode - Blasphemous Rumours

Private Internet Access to Be Acquired by Kape

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Private Internet Access, commonly known as PIA, is one of the largest VPN providers in the world.

In recent years it’s become a well-established brand that has had its no-logging policy tested in court, with success.

This week the company announced that some changes are afoot. PIA’s parent organization LTMI Holdings is in the process of a merger acquisition by the publicly traded Kape Technologies, which also owns the Cyberghost and Zenmate VPN services.

As part of the planned deal, Kape will pay $95.5 million. Part of this will be paid in cash, Vox reports, and Kape is also planning to pay the $32.1 million in existing debt PIA has on the books.

With the planned merger acquisition Kape hopes to become a dominant force in the VPN industry.

“In one acquisition, I believe we have positioned Kape to fast become one of the leading digital privacy service providers in the world, empowering consumers to manage their own data and digital security,” Kape’s CEO Ido Erlichman comments.

PIA’s CEO Ted Kim is also pleased with the deal and notes that it will help to improve the digital privacy and security of PIA’s subscribers worldwide.

There are no changes planned in the short term. The Private Internet Access name will remain in use for now, just as Cyberghost and Zenmate are still using their original brands. However, the acquisition has raised questions among some users.

Some have pointed at Kape’s history. The company had previously operated under the name Crossrider and was active in the advertising space. Among other things, it installed toolbars with ‘potentially unwanted software.’ While the company has since switched to a focus on cybersecurity, this past has made some people suspicious.

In an article addressing some of the questions, PIA assured its subscribers that its course is not going to change. According to Chief Communications Officer, Christel Dahlskjaer, privacy and security remain the top priority.

“From day one, we have been clear that your privacy is our policy and that the Private Internet Access VPN and our other privacy products exist to bring power to the people.

“The people are our stakeholders, and it is to you all, collectively, that we must remain accountable,” Dahlskjaer adds. She points out that PIA worked with Kape’s to establish a shared mission and guiding principles, which reflects the core values.

It’s inevitable that any corporate deal in the VPN industry will be watched closely and that’s a good thing. VPN providers rely on trust and should be judged by their actions. The company that protects its customers the best way it can, will ultimately be the most successful.

PIA believes that, by teaming up with Kape, it has the best shot at achieving this goal and asks users to give it the time to prove itself.

Disclaimer: PIA is one of our sponsors. This article was written independently, as all of our articles are. We generally don’t report on VPN business news but felt that it was good to mention this development.

Source: TF, for the latest info on copyright, file-sharing, torrent sites and more. We also have VPN reviews, discounts, offers and coupons.

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teh_g
229 days ago
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Hopefully PIA stays one of the best VPNs for security and privacy.
Roseville, CA
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Verizon demands $880 from rural library for just 0.44GB of roaming data

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The word,

Enlarge (credit: Verizon)

A small library that lends out mobile hotspots is facing a tough budget decision because one of its borrowers accidentally ran up $880 in roaming fees and Verizon refuses to waive or reduce the charges. The library has an "unlimited" data plan for the hotspots, but Verizon says it has to pay the $880 to cover less than half a gigabyte of data usage that happened across the border with Canada.

Tully Free Library in Tully, New York, a town of less than 3,000 people, lends out three Verizon hotspots to a rural population that has limited Internet access. The library started the hotspot-lending program with a grant from the Central New York Library Resources Council, which paid the bill for two years. Crucially, the service plan with Verizon blocked international roaming so that library borrowers wouldn't rack up unintentional charges if they happened to cross the Canadian border.

But when the grant ran out, Tully Free Library had to get a new contract and service plan, and the organization began paying the bill itself. The new plan seemed to be identical to the old one, but it enabled international roaming.

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teh_g
336 days ago
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Can I just send this library some cash to help pay for this?
Roseville, CA
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